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Coda Conduct is a hip hop duo consisting of members Erica and Sally. Their style ranges from laid back, thoughtful and sincere to cheeky, upbeat and braggadocio.

““What’s really interesting to look at is the waves that we’ve seen before,” she says. “If you look at the history of hip hop in Australia and around the world, there have always been successful women. In Australia, it was MCs like Maya Jupiter and MC Trey back in the ’90s and early 2000s. Obviously, back then, hip hop wasn’t making radio – especially Australian hip hop – but as far as the scene was concerned, women like them were doing big things.

“What we’ve seen is a drop-off of sorts as hip hop in Australia has arrived commercially – the long-serving artists like Hilltop Hoods ended up getting played on Nova, whereas the women of the time disappeared. It’s important to keep in context that, for women in hip hop, this isn’t a new thing. We need to be aware it has every potential to drop off again. We can’t be complacent and just think that we’ve fixed that problem. Keeping a level of representation is a constant battle. It needs to be continually addressed, or else we will face the same problem in ten years’ time.” – Sally

Where you’re from, where you’re at: the changing face of Australian hip hop

http://hijacked.com.au/coda-conduct-how-to-crack-the-aussie-hip-hop-industry

““We had no idea how to start,” “It was like, you want to be a rapper, I want to be a rapper – maybe we can be rappers together!” “Unearthed has been so amazing to us,” says Sally. “They’re really about providing genuine opportunities to new artists.” “It can be worth waiting,” she says. “Refine your sound and figure out what you’re doing before you jump into that pool.”“One of the main things we’ve learned from Coda is business management,”

“I think both of us usually would use dry humour, keep a straight face, keep one-upping each other,” Coleman says. “People will text in being like, ‘I can’t stop laughing,’ and both of us are just like, ‘What? That was just a normal conversation. We weren’t trying to be funny.’”