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South West Syndicate (SWS) are an Australian Hip Hop collective from South West and Western Sydney. SWS first came together 25 years ago in 1992 and are reformed, working on brand new EP. Their first single ‘Back like a Boomerang’ has shaped the sound of the EP, donning a metal meets rap vibe. ‘Back like a Boomerang’ is due for release January 19 2017.


SWS core members are Munkimuk, Brothablack, Nasri Basal (Big Naz), Darren Stacey (Dax) of Aboriginal, Lebanese-Australian, and Pacific Islander descent and welcoming new members Tristan Field (Guitar), Dave Marsalis Drums, returning member The Black President (DJ) and Brendan Blacklock (Video).
SWS’ music incorporates sequencing, instruments and language, with material focusing on Indigenous rights, equality, racism, politics and low riders. SWS have recorded segments for Recovery and Triple J, helped run Hip-Hop Up Top for Triple J in Darwin, recorded material with Warren Williams, Nabarlek, Emma Donovan and George Rrurrambu, and supported Blackalicious, Mystic Journeymen and Living Legends on tour.
Additional members have been, Nadeena Dixon, Terrance Murphy,Kider, Ebony Williams, Danielle Tuwai, Mohammed Abdullah, Phil Pelia, Leo Tanoi, Safwan Barbour and Fadi Chami.

Awards
Deadly Award

South West Syndicate were an Australian hip-hop collective from Sydney. They started performing in 1992.[1] and have been made up of Aboriginal, Lebanese-Australian, Pacific Islander, Croatian, German and Anglo hip hop artists.[2] Core members include Munkimuk, Brothablack, Nasri Basal (Big Naz), Darren Stacey (Dax) with additional members Nadeena Dixon, Terrance Murphy,Kider, Ebony Williams, Danielle Tuwai, Mohammed Abdullah, Phil Pelia, Safwan Barbour and Fadi Chami.[3][4][5]
South West Syndicate won a Deadly in 2003 for Most Promising New Talent in Music.[6]
South West Syndicate have played at many events including Hip Hopera 1995, Survival, Sydney Writers’ Festival, NAIDOC Week, Arafura Games, Bankstown Festival, Bankstown Carnivale, Newtown Festival, Rock Against Racism, Asia-Pacific Conference, Youth Week, Corroboree 2000, Mascon Festival, Barunga Festival and Pacific Wave Festival
Formed in 1992, South West Syndicate are a collective of predominantly Indigenous musicians and performers from Sydney. Core members are Brothablack, Monkey Mark, Naz, Nadine, Les and Terrance, with additional members including Kider, Dax, Ebony, Mohammed and Steven. Members’ ages vary from nine to thirtysomething.
SWS’ music is best described as hip-hop. The music incorporates sequencing, sampling, live instruments such as didj, and rapping. Raps are done in language, and in English with Australian (not American) accents and lingo.
SWS are unashamedly political, with material focusing on a range of issues including Indigenous rights, equality, racism and politics.
SWS have played at many events including Survival, Sydney Writers’ Festival, NAIDOC Week, Arafura Games, Bankstown Festival, Bankstown Carnivale, Newtown Festival, Rock Against Racism, Asia-Pacific Conference, Youth Week, Corroboree 2000, Mascon Festival, Barunga Festival and Pacific Wave Festival.
SWS have recorded segments for Recovery and Triple J, helped run Hip-Hop Up Top for Triple J in Darwin, performed at the Australian Museum, recorded material with Warren Williams, Nabarlek, Emma Donovan and George Rrurrambu, and supported Blackalicious, Mystic Journeymen and Living Legends on tour.

. In 1993 Munki Mark founded multicultural hip
hop collective South West Syndicate, an extended family of a crew which included a
quadriplegic Lebanese-Australian MC as well as Pacific Islander, Croatian, German,
Lebanese and Anglo members at various times. SWS played a major part in ‘Hip Hopera’,
a western Sydney community hip hop project directed by Morganics and Urban
Theatre Projects in 1995. ‘Hip Hopera’ was a watershed for Sydney hip hop, and SWS
subsequently won a Deadly Award in 2003, shortly before they broke up. In 1997 they
gave a high-powered live performance at Granville Town Hall as part of the Hip hop
for Palestine event, which was filmed by SBS but never screened. They were also
involved in A place o f peace, a three week hip hop project filmed by Penny Nutt for the
ABC’s Indigenous Unit in 2001, which was held at the Settlement Neighbourhood Centre
in Redfern, funded by the New South Wales Department of Education and Training.